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American Sniper

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Kung Fu

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American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 12:56 am

So a couple of family friends called me from New York and California about their experience at the movie theaters concerning the movie, American Sniper. They wanted to watch it out of pure curiosity and quickly found out that it was, of course nothing but propaganda against Muslims and Middle Easterners in general. At the end of the movie they all clapped and some people were even crying apparently.

Here, I thought Americans were smartening up but, I guess I was wrong. Typical brainwashed Americans still celebrating the killing of a bunch of innocent Iraqis. Worst of all Americans still think WW1 and every other war after was fought for our freedoms, which is a bunch of bullshit.
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 3:19 am

Well, let them be bro, if they wanna be comfy in their false perception of the USA and its imperialist agenda, it's all good in my book :D I mean, sheep will be sheep,

better to be a shepherd leading a flock of lambs than chasing sheep if you know what I mean.

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I have nothing to do with any recommendations to join any war on any person , race or community. I do not support ISIS nor any other movement, I seek opportunities to unite mankind, I seek to look at common ground and choose to ignore differences. I do not support violence, I condemn it. I have no affiliations with any promoting of violence be it political, racial or religious.
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 6:18 am

Chris Kyle, the Navy SEAL who the Oscar-nominated box office sensation "American Sniper" is based on, wrote a book by the same name that encapsulates his hatred, bigotry and enthusiasm for killing Iraqi "savages". But Kyle's unrepentant bloodlust is missing from the movie, which valorizes him as an anguished hero.

So here is the real Chris Kyle in his own words:

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Reminiscing about killing an Iraqi woman armed with a grenade in 2003, here is the real Chris Kyle. #AmericanSniper
12:17 AM - 16 Jan 2015

Chris Kyle: flagged lines such as, “I couldn’t give a flying fuck about the Iraqis” and “If you see anyone from about sixteen to sixty-five and they’re male, shoot ’em. Kill every male you see.”

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Chris Kyle: "I loved what I did...It was fun.I had the time of my life" Was this part in the movie?



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"I have a strong sense of justice. It's pretty much black-&-white. I dont see 2 much gray" #AmericanSniper Chris Kyle

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Chris Kyle abused animals. He'd "whack 'em upside their" heads so hard that he broke his hand twice. #AmericanSniper



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Chris Kyle "doubled over" at the "high-pitched screams" of Iraqis. "Cheap thrills were priceless."


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I knew going into the movie that Kyle would be sanitized for mass appeal. What I was not prepared for is the outrageous lengths to which the film goes to erase US criminality in Iraq while portraying the local Arab population, including small children, as irrationally violent monsters.

watched @AmericanSniper. It's brilliant propaganda that erases US crimes & sanitizes Chris Kyle's racist enthusiasm 4 killing "savages"

A common theme throughout @AmericanSniper is Arab women & children as armed fanatics. They're only victims when scary Arab men abuse them.

There's a scene in @AmericanSniper where an Arab man called "the butcher" kills a child in front of his father w/ a drill...

In @AmericanSniper Al Qaeda very suddenly appears in Iraq w/ no explanation of how. The US opened the floodgates. Erasing this is propaganda

Going into @AmericanSniper I thought the worst part was its glorification of a killer. But the real danger is its rewriting of the Iraq War.

And its portrayal of Arabs as subhuman creatures who apparently hate children, enjoy severing heads and love death... @AmericanSniper

AmericanSniper portrays Iraqi women & children as soulless monsters who Chris Kyle is forced to kill to protect invading US soldiers.

AmericanSniperpractically elevates invading US soldiers 2 civilian status and natives who target the armed invaders are evil terrorists.

Journalists Max Blumenthal and Dan Cohen had a similar reaction to the movie and raised several important points:

counted 4 Iraqi child characters in American Sniper. Two were "terrorists." One was son of a "terrorist" The fourth was tortured to death.

The only thing that surprised me about American Sniper was how deftly Eastwood churned a hero out of a failed war predicated on a huge lie.

The opening scene of American Sniper shows Kyle gun down an Iraqi boy and his mom to save our troops. Minutes later we flash back to 9-11.

I counted 3 Iraqi women characters in American Sniper. Two are "terrorists" & one cries as "The Butcher" tortures her son to death w/a drill

American Sniper portrays a sniper from far away raiding native homes & a native sniper killing those raiding homes. Guess who the bad guy is

I watched American Sniper. It's a racist whitewash of history that canonizes a mass murderer.

Opening scene of #AmericanSniper seamlessly blends shooting a child & an animal. The real Chris Kyle wasn't anguished. He loved what he did.


Most Iraqis in #AmericanSniper are portrayed as bloodthirsty killers. The film never broaches why they took up arms against the occupier.

AmericanSniper glossed over Chris Kyle's death at the hands of another veteran. It's as if he died in combat.


A look at some of the human suffering "American Sniper" glosses over

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The history behind American Sniper -- from someone who was there.
http://www.telesurtv.net/english/opinio ... -0019.html

In Fallujah 2004 @DahrJamail describes "an endless stream of women & children sniped by Americans" http://www.antiwar.com/orig/jamail.php?articleid=2303 … #AmericanSniper

Illegal US war on Iraq left 1 million Iraqis dead, 4.5m displaced, 1 to 2m widowed & 5m orphaned http://www.alternet.org/tory/123818/ira ... on_orphans … #AmericanSniper

Did any footage of civilian contractors shooting Iraqis for fun, to country music, make it into American Sniper

phpBB [video]


It's no surprise that some moviegoers came away from "American Sniper" inspired to kill Arabs and Muslims


Ngl teared up at the end of American Sniper. Great fucking movie and now I really want to kill some fucking ragheads.
12:10 AM - 12 Jan 2015

American Sniper was so good. Makes me wanna join the Seals and take some towelheads out.
9:38 PM - 18 Jan 2015

This followed a deluge of death and rape threats MaxBlumenthal and I received after criticizing "American Sniper" lastmonth. Although Chris Kyle’s most ardent supporters claim to hate ISIS and AlQaeda, they often call on these terrorist groups to behead critics of US military aggression:


"Let ISIS rape you" and "Cut her head off": How #TCOT honors an American Sniper (with images, tweets) · RaniaKhalek

Anti-America Anti-Israel Anti-Chris Kyle Hater Displays Her Hatred and Intolerance (with tweets) · American4Kyle

Meanwhile, "American Sniper" has been nominated for 6 Academy Awards and continues to garner widespread mainstream praise


Top Iraq War advocate @JoeBiden, who called Bush's AUMF a "march to peace and security," wept at #AmericanSniper film http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... niper.html

https://storify.com/RaniaKhalek/america ... -own-words

quote:

I have not seen American Sniper. But if the trailer is any indication, Eastwood’s film, like Zero Dark Thirty, tries to make a straightforward situation more complex than it is.

phpBB [video]


Bradley Cooper, who plays Kyle, seems beset by uncertainty and moral anxiety in the above scene. But anyone who has read Kyle’s autobiography of the same title knows that his bravado left no room for doubt. For him, the enemy are savages and despicably evil. His only regret is that he didn’t kill more. He laments that there were rules of engagement, or ROE, which he describes as being drafted by lawyers to protect generals from politicians. He argues instead for letting warriors loose to fight wars without their hands tied behind their backs. At another point, he boasts that the unofficial ROE were pretty simple: “If you see anyone from about sixteen to sixty-five and they’re male, shoot ‘em. Kill every male you see.”

That kind of thinking, compared to Kyle's portrayal by Eastwood, prompted Lindy West to write an article for The Guardian asking, “The real American Sniper was a hate-filled killer. Why are simplistic patriots treating him as a hero?” One answer to that question: Because many Americans are unable to accept that nothing was won in Iraq, and that the sacrifices Kyle and others made were not worth it. More fundamentally, treating Kyle as a patriot and ignoring any other possibility allows Americans to ignore the consequences of invading a country that had no weapons of mass destruction, had nothing to do with 9/11, and had no meaningful ties to Al Qaeda (our invasion, of course, changed that).

A recent study estimates there were 461,000 war-related "excess" deaths in Iraq between 2003 and mid-2011. If true, President George W. Bush may be responsible for the deaths of more Iraqi civilians than Saddam Hussein was. But Bush is not solely culpable. We live in a democracy where the people elect the government, and therefore citizens cannot escape the blame for what it does. In that sense, it is not just Kyle who pulled the trigger. We all did.

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/1207 ... chris-kyle













RaniaKhalek




4 days ago
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 6:39 am

When are we going to see a $70,000,000 movie from the perspective of the Iraqis? or a $70,000,000 movie from the perspective of victims of Israeli terrorism? NEVER

This Hollywood claptrap they put out called Art is meant to get people to think? Ha...PROPAGANDA is so powerful and yet so obvious today it is disgusting :evil: Maybe people ought to turn off there TV sets, games and movies and ACTUALLY READ ABOUT UNBIASED HISTORY...REAL HISTORY...NOT THE BS PEOPLE ARE FED, they might learn something from it but so many today could not be bothered to...HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF.. yet we live in MUCH MORE DANGEROUS TIMES.

With technology there is NO END to the limits of PROPAGANDA.
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 1:23 pm

I mean it's a movie directed by Clint Eastwood, a pretty huge conservative, so this shouldn't be terribly surprising. I've talked to numerous familya nd friends who are excited to see this movie and pretty much none of them are interested in learning about the kind of person Kyle was, as Sarah has outlined. If you bring it up they plug their ears or justify his actions and words. And no I'm going to justify his actions and words a bit:

Chris Kyle was a psychopath that was given freedom to do as he pleased. It's not his fault we went to war, he just benefited from it greatly and enjoyed it more than anyone probably should. I think he was pretty much an awful human being, but in the context of him and a lot of the country being brainwashed by the media and government into believing we were doing the right thing all those years ago, I can kind of sympathize with him. I don't sympathize with his lack of remorse in any way, nor his bloodlust, but the idea that he had to kill certain targets to save his comrade's lives (such as that woman with the grenade) I can sympathize with. And if the man had any conscience or remorse at all I might have felt really bad for him and the things he was made to do. However, it doesn't seem he suffered from either of those things and instead was, like I said, just a psycho with a gun and permission to use it. The problem with most conservatives' view of Kyle and the war in general is that they don't see the war as a mistake we made that resulted in the Iraqis hating us and wanting to kill us. We invaded them, not the other way around. But they have convinced themselves it was justified and that we were just defending ourselves so all Iraqi and Afghani lives are forfeit and worthless. That's really the saddest part, and even sadder that I don't think there is anything that could actually convince them otherwise.

Luckily though, the internet is a thing now and it will be harder to propagandize children as time goes on because they will have access to truths that would otherwise be hidden from them at their fingertips in this day and age. Any kid that goes on Reddit is likely to learn what kind of person Chris Kyle really was if they have any interest in the topic at all. So Eastwood's cherry-picked and sympathetic depiction of Kyle and his story hopefully won't have the affect it might have once been able to have. At least on the kids. Good luck convincing a 45 year old conservative man that Chris Kyle wasn't the most badass hero we've ever seen. Speaking of which: While sniping is really hard to do and takes a lot of skill, how is it not one fo the most cowardly positions in any armed forces? You're doing all of your work from relatively very safe distances. The only safer job would be drone operator I think.
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 1:48 pm

Loki wrote: I don't sympathize with his lack of remorse in any way, nor his bloodlust, but the idea that he had to kill certain targets to save his comrade's lives (such as that woman with the grenade) I can sympathize with.


I'm assuming you're talking about the woman and her child? That whole part was one of the worst scenes of the movie. Apparently now Muslim women and Muslim children can't be trusted either so when it comes down to it every Muslim is the enemy whether it be man, woman, or child.

This movie was nothing but filth. Watch it win award after award.
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 1:53 pm

Kung Fu wrote:
Loki wrote: I don't sympathize with his lack of remorse in any way, nor his bloodlust, but the idea that he had to kill certain targets to save his comrade's lives (such as that woman with the grenade) I can sympathize with.


I'm assuming you're talking about the woman and her child? That whole part was one of the worst scenes of the movie. Apparently now Muslim women and Muslim children can't be trusted either so when it comes down to it everyone Muslim is the enemy whether it be man, woman, or child.

This movie was nothing but filth. Watch it win award after award.


I haven't actually seen the movie, I don't want to support it by giving them money. I've just read about the situation with the woman holding the grenade through excerpts from his book and reports from the military. If I'm not mistaken it was a legitimate "suicide bomb" threat to other US troops so he took the shot. However, what people don't like to think about is that had we not invaded Iraq under false pretenses and outright lies that woman would probably have never had a grenade in her hand in her entire life.

That said, a lot of the stories and claims Kyle made in his book are disputed or unverified, I just thought I'd seen that that one at least was verified.
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"We all are to some extent [agnostic]... So yes, I'm an 'agnostic', in as much as I don't actually know what happens when I die. I choose to operate under the assumption that God does not exist. I have no need for God in my life, the concept of a 'God' feels incredibly made up to me. It is not requisite for my every day living. For some people it is. They are 'theistic agnostics,' I am an 'atheistic agnostic.'" - Cara Santa Maria
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 20, 2015 3:52 pm

How would Americans react if FAR MORE POWERFUL military foreign armies enforced with high grade weapons, white phosphorous, uranium depleted weapons, Blackhawk helicopters, psychological warfare weapons, thousands of civilian private/military contractors (shooting people at random driving down highways etc.), snipers shooting those trying to help the wounded and given orders anyone between 16 and 65 is fair game, brutal home invasions etc.. invaded America? AND THE REASON FOR THE INVASION WAS BASED ON LIES/PROPAGANDA.

How would Americans react when the majority of Americans were put immediately out of work while loads of foreigners were flown in and took your jobs while you are left struggling to provide for your own families under horrible conditions and this was after a previous assault 12 years before and you had already endured years of an embargo/sanctions that cut off even medical supplies for the suffering and terminally ill.

When asked on US television if she [Madeline Albright, US Secretary of State] thought that the death of half a million Iraqi children [from sanctions in Iraq] was a price worth paying, Albright replied: “This is a very hard choice, but we think the price is worth it.”

— John Pilger, Squeezed to Death, Guardian, March 4, 2000

How would Americans react if their own pregnant mothers and wives were giving birth to horribly deformed babies due to the illegal weapons dumped during the invasion? How would they react if there own families, neighbors and loved ones were being slaughtered supposedly in the name of 'democracy' and 'freedom according to the invading armies'? How would they react if there own natural resources and ancient historical artifacts were being plundered?

How would Americans react if they were viewed as terrorists if they fought back? if they were seen as the soulless and evil bad ones? How would Americans feel if a movie was made about it from the justified viewpoint of the invading snipers and most everyone cheered and gave the highest of accolades to it.

That Americans and supporting military forces along with millions of civilians in our countries REFUSED or were disinterested in seeing through THE LIES and PROPAGANDA being put forth BEFORE AND DURING THE INVASIONS.....ARE NOT AN EXCUSE. I along with millions of PROTESTERS around the world DID see through the LIES.. BEFORE THE ATTACKS ON IRAQ STARTED... those protests were shown via the mass media and were well known about. It didn't take much to see through THE LIES....a day spent home googling the facts about the supposed 'weapons of mass destruction' and how diplomacy was being run over would have sufficed. :evil:

It was and still is WILLFUL IGNORANCE.

Making a hero out of Chris Kyle as well as the way this movie has been constructed and is being promoted is beyond shameful. NONE of it would have happened if not for the FALSE FLAG Neocon/Mossad operation of 911. :evil:
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Re: American Sniper

PostTue Jan 27, 2015 1:22 pm

Eddie Ray Routh - Killer of Chris Kyle and Charles Littleton

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Eddie Ray Routh

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Eddie Ray Routh in court.

Routh got heatstroke and fell ill. Laura drove to Houston to bring her brother home. On the way back, he told her that he had a tapeworm. He “kept obsessing over it,” Laura said. Raymond took him to the Dallas Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Doctors there failed to find a tapeworm. Routh stayed in the hospital a few more days, for further tests, then checked himself out. (The V.A. does not comment on the treatment of individual patients.)


Not long after, Raymond took him to Richland Chambers Lake, in Corsicana, Texas. “That’s where we always went to relax and get away, had the father-and-son moments,” he said. “I got him there and he was talking all kinds of goddam bullshit. I mean, this off-the-wall shit—how he’s Dracula, how he’s a werewolf, and all this shit.” Twice, Routh walked over to his father’s car, retrieved a .357 Magnum that Raymond carried with him outside the house, and threatened to kill himself. Raymond took the pistol away both times; after the second instance, he emptied the cylinder and threw the bullets into the lake. He finally persuaded Routh to go back to the Dallas V.A. Raymond recalled, “The doctor was writing all the stuff down and I said, ‘Eddie, why don’t you tell her what you’ve been telling me all day? About wanting to hurt yourself, and how you’re Dracula and all this bullshit?’ ” This time, Routh stayed for three weeks. Raymond recalled that when Routh had been admitted, in the emergency room, one of the doctors had given him a diagnosis of P.T.S.D.


During Routh’s stay at the Dallas V.A., Raymond and Jodi failed to notice much progress, but his doctors eventually cited sufficient improvement to release him. They prescribed eight medications for his son, which, according to Raymond, were placed in “one of those gallon baggies.” Among the drugs were lithium, which treats mania; prazosin, which can help decrease nightmares; and Zoloft, an antidepressant that is a common treatment for P.T.S.D. Raymond said that the cocktail of pharmaceuticals “made Eddie worse,” adding, “I ain’t no doctor. I ain’t no rocket scientist or nothing, but I could tell a difference in him.” Routh was still jobless and continued to drink. He went back to cutting grass for a real-estate agent, who told me that Routh was a “good worker” and “very congenial.” In January, 2012, he was pulled over in his pickup truck and arrested for drunk driving. In Routh’s case, no judge dismissed the charges; he was found guilty and held on a fifteen-hundred-dollar bond. Unable to pay, he served a thirty-day jail sentence.


Other, more disturbing, episodes suggested that Routh’s experiences in the Marines were still causing him duress. He would swim only in pools where he could see the bottom; Jen suspects this was related to the trauma of removing dead bodies from the water in Haiti. He was menaced by the prospect of someone drowning. On a family vacation in Colorado, he “freaked out” when he spotted his baby niece on a bridge. “He thought we would let her fall in the river and drown and be gone forever,” Jodi said. Crowds made him anxious. Last year, he spent the Fourth of July at his parents’ house, and was repeatedly jangled by the sound of neighborhood fireworks. “A lot of the things we did were outside, or with family,” Jen recalled. “He didn’t have a very vast friend group.” Although she recognized that his behavior was strange, she thought that he was just excitable—someone who had “extreme A.D.D.”


At the party, he told his father that he was interested in going to college, with the goal of becoming a game warden. Raymond knew that his son didn’t have much money, so he offered to sell some of his guns—heirlooms that had been passed down from his grandfather and his father. “If it would benefit you, sell ’em,” Raymond said. But something “clicked in Eddie’s head,” and he flew into a rage. He and his dad got into a fistfight, and Raymond “popped him in his jaw.” Routh stomped toward the house, threatening to “blow his brains out” and “suck-start a rifle.” Jodi knew that he was going for the guns, and she grabbed one of Routh’s friends and told him to get the weapons out of the house. Routh fumed when he found the gun closet empty and shouted, “I’ll blow all your brains out!”

Jodi called the police, telling the operator, “They need to admit him to the mental ward.” Routh left on foot with his dog, a black lab named Girley. He wasn’t wearing shoes or a shirt. The cops found him a few blocks away, reeking of booze. According to the police report, Routh told them that he suffered from P.T.S.D., and that his parents did “not understand what he has been through.” The police handcuffed him, pushed him into their cruiser, and drove him home. Jodi met the officers outside and urged them to take her son to Green Oaks Hospital, a psychiatric facility in Dallas. They did so; after a day or two, Routh asked to be transferred to the Dallas V.A. A few days later, he was discharged. According to Jodi and Raymond, the doctors there were aware that Routh had made violent threats.


But Routh’s depression and weariness remained, and he began to exhibit symptoms more commonly associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. “He would get into these moods where you could understand what he was saying, but you had no idea where it was coming from,” Laura said. “We were talking, and he was, like, ‘Man, I’m ready to hit those ski slopes.’ And I was like, ‘What?’ And he’s like, ‘You know, that would be great. Catch some powder?’ I’ve never been skiing in my life. And we had just been talking about fishing. He would just make absolutely no sense.” Some of the things he said had a conspiratorial tone. He once told Laura, “There’s gonna be a conviction. I’m gonna tell everything, and it’s not going to be what you think.”


One Saturday in January, Routh and Jen were hanging around her apartment when he fell into a state of paranoia. He began ranting to Jen and her roommate about government-surveillance activities. He once told a friend that the helicopters overhead were watching him.


Inside the apartment, Routh began pacing in front of Jen’s door, clutching a knife. He said that he was prepared to defend her from government agents who were out to get them. For hours, she tried, unsuccessfully, to calm him. Finally, Jen’s roommate texted the police, who arrested Routh and took him to Green Oaks. He was transferred to the Dallas V.A. the next day.


The quality of care varies from one V.A. facility to the next. In 2004, the V.A. Inspector General called the Dallas facility the worst in the nation; last year, a Dallas TV station interviewed veterans who alleged that the facility was so poor that it put “lives at risk.” The V.A. tends to be slow, taking an average of nine months to determine if it will cover a veteran’s health claim. And getting a claim approved can be even more difficult if symptoms are not observed at a veteran’s exit physical. Yet P.T.S.D.’s symptoms may not emerge for a while, and they are often accompanied by a cascade of other health problems. Chiarelli, the former vice-chief of the Army, told me that doctors should be “given more latitude” in assessing combat veterans, adding, “But there’s where you get into cost issues.” The V.A. is a sclerotic and overwhelmed bureaucracy; it barely has the resources to maintain its current level of health coverage, let alone expand it. (A spokesman acknowledged that veterans wait “too long for earned benefits,” and said, “We have an aggressive plan in place to end the backlog in 2015.”)

After Routh arrived at the Dallas V.A., Jodi and Jen visited him in the evenings. A week later, he did not seem much better. He was taking several medications, and Jodi felt that he could hardly carry on a conversation. She urged the doctors to keep him hospitalized, at least until he was stable.

Ignoring Jodi’s request, the V.A. discharged Routh the next day; according to Jodi, the doctors shared this news over the phone, saying that Routh was an adult and wanted to leave. When she drove to the V.A. to pick up her son, he was already out, sitting in the lobby. She brought him home and told him about Chris Kyle, whom she had just met. “I said, ‘This guy has a big reputation. He’s a really good man and he really wants to help you.’ And then he’s like, ‘Mom, that is so awesome,’ ” Jodi recalled. “Eddie was happy. He could feel that somebody wanted to help him, somebody that understood better than me.”

The next few days were difficult. Jen, who is Catholic, said that Routh was fixated on “demons and devils.” He went with her to Mass on Sunday, hoping that it would help him. At home with Jodi, he fluctuated between being angry and wound up, and being dazed and emotionless.


During the day, Jodi said, “he still wasn’t able to carry on a good conversation. He wasn’t making good sense. He was crying a lot. He would come lay down in our bedroom. We’d bring in the dog and lay in the bed and he’d say, ‘Mom, will you hold my hand? I’m so scared. I don’t feel good. I’m not good.’ ”

As Jodi held him, Routh said, “I just wish you could be in my head for just a second, just so you could know what I’m feeling like.”

“I wish I could,” Jodi told him. “I would take it from you.”

On the morning of Wednesday, January 30th, Jodi brought Routh back to the V.A., for a follow-up appointment. As a psychiatrist reviewed his chart, he noted that Routh had been prescribed only half the recommended dosage of risperidone—a powerful antipsychotic that has been widely used in V.A. hospitals to treat P.T.S.D. The psychiatrist adjusted the prescription and ordered the medication to be sent to the Routh house in two days. Jodi was livid. When the psychiatrist questioned Routh, he looked to his mom.

“He just wasn’t capable of speaking for himself,” she told me. She explained to the psychiatrist that Routh wasn’t sleeping and “couldn’t think straight.” She pleaded with the psychiatrist to readmit him to the hospital, where “he’s not going to be a danger to others or to himself.” But the psychiatrist, according to Jodi, shook his head and said that hospitalization wasn’t necessary. (The psychiatrist, citing patient confidentiality, declined to discuss Routh’s case, but said that any patient who posed an “imminent threat to himself or others” would be hospitalized.)

Jodi then asked the psychiatrist if he could refer Routh to a residential program for people with P.T.S.D., in Waco, Texas. According to the program’s Web site, residents there “attend therapeutic groups and rehabilitative activities. Some parts of the program help vets to deal with traumatic experiences, while other parts of the program help the vet to acquire healthy behaviors and coping skills.” The Web site notes that the program is intended only for veterans who “are not a danger to themselves or others.”

The psychiatrist told Jodi, “He’s not stable enough for that program.” He instructed Routh to come back in two weeks. Jodi recalled, “I thought, Two weeks! That’s a long time. I told the doctor, ‘You know, he can’t even answer your questions! He can’t even carry on a conversation. I really think he needs to be in the hospital.’ ”

Routh was sent home. Jodi thought again of Chris Kyle. A few hours after she had introduced herself to him in the school parking lot, she was called down to the principal’s office and found Kyle there, waiting.


Kyle said that he could take Routh fishing or hunting or, perhaps, to the rifle range. He couldn’t do it this weekend, though, because his brother’s wife was about to have a baby, and he was heading out of town. One of Kyle’s former SEAL teammates, Mike Ritland, told me that firing guns was a “common ground we all have, whether you’re Marines or Army or Navy. It’s a way of blowing off steam—a stress release for both guys.” Jonathan Shay, the psychiatrist, is less confident that “going to the gun range and busting some caps” makes sense as “a healing experience.” P.T.S.D. veterans, he said, carry “wounds of the mind and spirit, and one of the ways in which these wounds manifest themselves is through explosiveness.”


Routh was looking forward to the excursion. He craved the kind of companionship and solidarity that Kyle seemed capable of providing. “He needed someone to validate what he was feeling, that it was O.K. for other people to go through it,” Jen said.

The previous evening, Routh had proposed to Jen. “We were in the kitchen,” she recalled. “I was getting him his medicine. I turned around, and he got to one knee and asked me to marry him.” Routh didn’t have a ring—he was broke—but pledged to save up for one. Jen accepted the proposal, and spent the night at the house in Lancaster. (After the knife episode, Jen’s apartment building had banned Routh from the property.) They got into an argument the next morning, however, and she left around ten o’clock. Kyle and Littlefield showed up a few hours later.

Routh climbed into Kyle’s F-350, and they headed to Rough Creek Lodge, a resort ninety miles to the southwest.


Kyle parked in front of the main lodge around 3 P.M. Routh stayed in the truck while Kyle and Littlefield went inside to register. The property extends over eleven thousand acres; hunting grounds and the rifle range cover more than two-thirds of it, and a locked gate prevents golfers from straying into dangerous areas. At Kyle’s request, an employee radioed ahead to unlock the gate. Kyle and Littlefield got back in the truck, and they bumped along a dirt road for a few miles. They reached the shooting platform and raised a red Bravo flag, to warn others away. Kyle had reserved the range until four o’clock.

At 4:55 P.M., a guide noticed that the flag was still up. He drove toward the platform. He noticed several weapons set out, waiting to be fired, but he did not see Kyle’s truck. From a distance, the guide saw what appeared to be a sack. As he drew nearer, he realized that it was a dead body. Littlefield was on his back, with multiple gunshots in the chest; his pistol remained tucked in his jeans. Up close, the guide discerned grooves in the sand around Littlefield’s fingers, suggesting that he had clawed for life after hitting the ground.

Several feet away, Kyle was lying face down. He had been shot in the back and in the back of the head. Blood covered his baseball cap. His pistol lay in the sand, within reach. The guide called 911, then bent over Kyle to administer CPR. It was hopeless. He was dead.

As medics and police descended on Rough Creek, Routh was behind the wheel of Kyle’s truck. He stopped at a relative’s home, in Alvarado, around five, and called his sister. She asked about his day, and he said, “It’s kind of shitty. I broke up with my girlfriend from Louisiana.” Laura, assuming that he was talking about Jen, didn’t press him. (Jen is not from Louisiana.) Routh said that he was coming by. Laura plugged in her cell phone, whose battery was drained. “If he says anything crazy, I’m calling the police,” she told her husband, Gaines.

Twenty minutes later, Routh entered the house. He asked them if the world was freezing over, then announced that he had a new truck. Laura asked if he had traded in his car, a Volkswagen Beetle; he said no, but added, “I sold my soul for a truck.” He went on, “We went up to the gun range. I killed them.”

Laura asked her brother what he was talking about.

“Chris and his friend. I killed them. I murdered them,” he said.

“I didn’t really think he was telling the truth,” Laura told me. “And he’s, like, ‘Are you and Gaines in Hell with me?’ And I was, like, ‘No, we’re not in Hell.’ And he was, like, ‘Well, do you think I can get to Oklahoma?’ And I was, like, ‘Oklahoma? What’s in Oklahoma?’ And he’s, like, ‘Well, if I can get to Oklahoma, I can get out of this.’ And I was, like, ‘I don’t know what you’re talking about, but I think you’re telling me a story. Don’t lie to me. Tell me what happened.’ And at this point we’re almost to the front door, and so we walked outside, and when we walked outside I thought I was gonna throw up on myself, because here’s this truck that I know he could never afford. The tires alone were expensive. That’s the first thing I saw—these giant, big knobby tires on this pickup truck.”

Laura realized that Routh really must have killed two men. He offered to show Gaines the murder weapon, and began reaching into a tool chest in the truck. They told him to stop. Laura was afraid for herself and for Gaines, and she asked Routh to leave and turn himself in. Before he drove off, he said to her, “I love you, Beezer.”

“That’s my nickname—my family’s always called me that,” she told me. “In that moment, he was my baby brother again. He started walking toward me and he hugged me. And I gave him a hug back. ‘I love you, too, but I hate your demons. Please tell me this is not true,’ I said. He just looked at me with this weird look I’ve never seen from him before.”

When he was gone, Laura phoned the police. “He’s fucking psychotic,” she told the dispatcher. Her brother had P.T.S.D., she continued, and he had told Laura and her husband that “he killed them”—Kyle and Littlefield—“before they could kill him. He said he couldn’t trust anyone anymore.”


A police bulletin went out. Two officers waited outside the Routh house, which was empty—Jodi and Raymond were out of town. Routh pulled up around 8 P.M. and parked out front. The cops approached on foot. They carried on a conversation for approximately fifteen minutes before Routh threw the truck into drive and sped away. A chase ensued, and they caught him after authorities spiked his tires. At the police station, he confessed to killing Kyle and Littlefield. When the Texas Rangers searched the Rouths’ home, they found a bong and a box of ammunition.

That night, Routh was transferred to a jail in Erath County, where the murders took place. He has been on suicide watch since then. He is permitted to write letters and make phone calls, although Jen has not heard from him in months. She still loves him, and does not know whether she should stop considering herself engaged. Routh is facing charges of capital murder.

Not long after the murders, he sent me a brief letter, written in pencil: “I need out of the box I’m in. If you could help let me know. Want to go back overseas to help the world.”

h"My client will plead not guilty by reason of insanity," Routh's attorney, J. Warren St. John, told People Magazine in a report on Wednesday.

St. John, who did not immediately respond to a request for comment from ABC News, has previously said he is concerned about getting an impartial jury, in part, due to the film starringBradley Cooper.

"The film will be an issue," St. John told People. "I think any case with significant publicity has an issue with picking a jury. I've had them in the past, and anything that has significant national attention makes it hard to pick a jury."

Routh's attorneys filed a motion in 2013 to change the location of the trial, but it was denied.
ttp://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/0 ... crosshairs


Suspected 'American Sniper' killer Eddie Ray Routh to go to trial
Posted: Jan 26, 2015 9:37 AM AST

The murder trial of the man accused of killing the real-life "American Sniper" is scheduled to begin next month.

Routh's trial is scheduled to start on Feb. 11, pending jury selection in the days prior, according to the clerk for Erath County District Court in Texas.

Prosecutors have said they will not seek the death penalty for Routh in the gun range killing of Kyle and Kyle's friend, Chad Littlefield.

"My client will plead not guilty by reason of insanity," Routh's attorney, J. Warren St. John, told People Magazine in a report on Wednesday.

St. John, who did not immediately respond to a request for comment from ABC News, has previously said he is concerned about getting an impartial jury, in part, due to the film starringBradley Cooper.

"The film will be an issue," St. John told People. "I think any case with significant publicity has an issue with picking a jury. I've had them in the past, and anything that has significant national attention makes it hard to pick a jury."

Routh's attorneys filed a motion in 2013 to change the location of the trial, but it was denied.

http://www.waow.com/story/27939258/2015 ... o-to-trial


Jessie Ventura Clears Up About American Sniper & Chris Kyle

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Jessie Ventura has always known how to make headlines, but when he sued Chris Kyle‘s estate for defamation over his portrayal in the book ‘American Sniper‘, the media gave him so headlines he wasn’t expecting. Mainly he was attacked for suing a poor widow and children, but the National Review reported that while Kyle claimed to have donated his books earning to Veteran’s Charities, it was more like only two percent went there.

It was these misconceptions that Ventura has been wanting to clear up. Even after winning the lawsuit, Anderson Cooper, Sarah Palin and Bill O’Reilly made rather chilly comments. Basically, Ventura was asking that the information in ‘American Sniper’ that was untrue about him be taken out and for Chris Kyle to publicly admit that it was untrue. Lawyers seemed to think that it would be easier to settle the case, but for anyone who has known the former Minnesota Governor any amount of time knows that he will stand firm when it comes to principle’s he believes in, including going after someone who has sullied your name.

As the box office weekend shows, American Sniper has hit a soft spot with Americans, so it’s understandable how the media and people thought Ventura was going rogue, but it doesn’t make it right. The film has pulled in over $200 million so it’s going to have people taking a closer look. Ventura also made a point of letting it be known that the book was a mix of fact and fiction alluding that the film is the same way.

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On his podcast, “We the people with Jesse Ventura,” the former governor gives an updated statement about American Sniper as the book-turned-movie came to theaters nationwide this past weekend.

Jesse Ventura explains there are still many “misconceptions” about his recent lawsuit win against the Chris Kyle estate:

“[One] of the grave misconceptions about this lawsuit: I was taking money from a widow and her children — no I wasn’t. Her expenses were paid entirely from a giant insurance company. The Kyle family hasn’t suffered one dime of monetary loss,” Jesse Ventura says.

“My lawsuit was to clear my name and show this was a fabrication and a lie,” he continues. He explains that the lawsuit was over what Scruff Face, the character Kyle depicted as Jesse Ventura in American Sniper, said against the Navy SEALS and the military.

“My lawsuit was originally started because this person in the chapter, Scruff Face, committed treason. The chapter took the book to number one [on the New York Times bestsellers list] and ultimately got it the movie deal. The point is, this was fabricated. It never happened,” Ventura says. “I would never say anything like that against my own unit or the military itself.”

During his podcast statement, Jesse Ventura explains he went to settlements “four or five times” before going to trial. All he asked was for the publisher to remove the Scruff Face chapter and for Chris Kyle to publicly admit to the lie; they refused.

“The only thing I was offered was money,” said Ventura. “I refused to settle because to me it wasn’t about money, it was about the truth…they would do nothing to restore my reputation…the only way to stop [the lie] was to bring a lawsuit.”

He also addresses the monetary outcome of the trial: “The jury gave me what they felt I was damaged. The majority of that money is going to my attorney. Again, this will cost the Kyle family nothing for the lie that was written about me.”

And what does Jesse Ventura think about the book being a nonfiction account of a soldier’s experiences, both home and abroad?

“The book is not a true story. The book had fabrication and fiction written into it. [The Scruff Face] chapter was absolutely fabricated.”

Jesse Ventura ends his statement by thanking his fans for standing by him through the trial: “You don’t know how much it means to me. I’ve lost friendships over this, I’ve lost things very close to me over this, my life will never be the same because of this, and I can only state I am a complete innocent victim of the whole thing. I don’t know why I was thrown under the bus.”

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The Film Invents a Terrorist Sniper Who Works For Multiple Opposing Factions: Kyle’s primary antagonist in the film is a sniper named Mustafa. Mustafa is mentioned in a single paragraph in Kyle’s book, but the movie blows him up into an ever-present figure and Syrian Olympic medal winner who fights for both Sunni insurgents in Fallujah and the Shia Madhi army.

The Film Portrays Chris Kyle as Tormented By His Actions: Multiple scenes in the movie portray Kyle as haunted by his service. One of the film’s earliest reviews praised it for showing the “emotional torment of so many military men and women.” But that torment is completely absent from the book the film is based on. In the book, Kyle refers to everyone he fought as “savage, despicable” evil. He writes, “I only wish I had killed more.” He also writes, “I loved what I did. I still do. If circumstances were different – if my family didn’t need me – I’d be back in a heartbeat. I’m not lying or exaggerating to say it was fun. I had the time of my life being a SEAL.” On an appearance on Conan O’Brien’s show he laughs about accidentally shooting an Iraqi insurgent. He once told a military investigator that he doesn’t “shoot people with Korans. I’d like to, but I don’t.”

The Real Chris Kyle Made Up A Story About Killing Dozens of People In Post-Katrina New Orleans: Kyle claimed that he killed 30 people in the chaos of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, a story Louisiana writer Jarvis DeBerry calls “preposterous.” It shows the sort of mentality post-war Kyle had, but the claim doesn’t appear in the film.

The Real Chris Kyle Fabricated A Story About Killing Two Men Who Tried To Carjack Him In Texas: Kyle told numerous people a story about killing two alleged carjackers in Texas. Reporters tried repeatedly to verify this claim, but no evidence of it exists.

Chris Kyle Was Successfully Sued For Lying About the Former Governor of Minnesota: Kyle alleged that former Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura defamed Navy SEALs and got into a fight with him at a local bar. Ventura successfully sued Kyle for the passage in his book, and a jury awarded him $1.845 million.

Chris Kyle’s Family Claimed He Donated His Book Proceeds To Veterans’ Charity, But He Kept Most Of The Profits: The National Review debunks the claim that all proceeds of his book went to veterans’ charities. Around 2 percent – $52,000 – went to the charities while the Kyles pocketed $3 million.

http://movietvtechgeeks.com/jesse-ventu ... hris-kyle/


February 2013, the release of the movie based on his book prompted renewed interest in both the events it depicted and other claims Kyle made during his lifetime.

Three particular incidents Kyle maintained he was involved in have caused the most controversy. They are:

• In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Kyle traveled to New Orleans and killed about thirty "looters" from a perch on top of the Superdome.

• During the funeral of a fellow Navy SEAL, Kyle punched out Jesse Ventura for saying something defamatory about SEALs.

• In 2009, Kyle shot and killed two individuals who attempted to steal his truck and was released by police without questioning due to the intercession of the Department of Defense.

The film based on Kyle's book complicated an already tangled narrative, though adaptation of autobiographies to the silver screen frequently invokes such creative license. However, the rumors that quickly became part of Kyle's legend came not from the book-to-film evolution but rather from the man himself.

Chris Kyle's claim he'd fired upon and killed dozens of "looters" after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005 preceded the other two tales. The story circulated through postings on several web sites and through a number of news articles, as well as being passed from person to person in both the online and offline worlds:

The SEALs began telling stories, and Kyle offered a shocking one. In the days after Hurricane Katrina, he said, the law-and-order situation was dire. He and another sniper travelled to New Orleans, set up on top of the Superdome, and proceeded to shoot dozens of armed residents who were contributing to the chaos. Three people shared with me varied recollections of that evening: the first said that Kyle claimed to have shot thirty men on his own; according to the second, the story was that Kyle and the other sniper had shot thirty men between them; the third said that she couldn't recall specific details.

Had Kyle gone to New Orleans with a gun?
Rumors of snipers — both police officers and criminal gunmen — circulated in the weeks after the storm. Since then, they have been largely discredited. A spokesman for U.S. Special Operations Command, or SOCOM, told me, "To the best of anyone's knowledge at SOCOM, there were no West Coast SEALs deployed to Katrina." When I related this account to one of Kyle's officers, he replied, sardonically, "I never heard that story." The SEAL with extensive experience in special-mission units wondered how dozens of people could be shot by high-velocity rifles and just disappear; Kyle's version of events, he said, "defies the imagination."

Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/military ... s5Btm5E.99


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Re: American Sniper

PostMon Feb 02, 2015 8:57 am

i thank God I don't live in the USA... damn... Americans think they live in the best country in the world ?

Atrocious.
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I have nothing to do with any recommendations to join any war on any person , race or community. I do not support ISIS nor any other movement, I seek opportunities to unite mankind, I seek to look at common ground and choose to ignore differences. I do not support violence, I condemn it. I have no affiliations with any promoting of violence be it political, racial or religious.
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